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Crime victim Tag

Haggard Law Firm > Posts tagged "Crime victim" (Page 2)

Pool Fence Removed, 1 & 3 Year Old Drown

A family and entire community remains devastated days after a 1 and 3-year-old drowned in a Cape Coral (FL.) Apartment Complex pool. It was last Sunday night when rescue crews were called to the Aurora Townhouse Condos. The local news media reports that they father of the young children went to the second floor of their two story townhouse to use the restroom. When he returned downstairs he found the two young children floating in the pool.

Adding to the tragedy are reports that the pool’s perimeter fence had been moved earlier in the year and never replaced. A woman who identified herself to the NBC Affiliate covering the story says she had asked the homeowners association to replace the pool fence quickly. But no action was taken by the board. (Watch NBC 2 Report).

The Haggard Law Firm has advocated for improving pool safety measures nationally and has successfully litigated several cases involving missing or broken pool fences including the Loren Hinton case (Click to watch video on Pool Gate Safety and Hinton Case) . Michael Haggard, the Firm’s Managing Partner said of the recent drownings, “this is another tragedy that is heart-wrenching and should have never occurred. Layers of protection such as pool fences are critical in the prevention of child drowning. ”

Understand Survivors and the Catastrophically Injured

Today’s issue of the Daily Business Review includes a Board of Contributors article authored by The Haggard law Firm‘s Jason Brenner. The article, Understanding Your Client: Survivors and the Catastrophically Injured, discusses the challenges to successfully representing and emotionally supporting during the civil litigation process the tragically injured or loved ones of someone who has died.

Media Confernece Announcing Lawsuit in Wrongful Death

MEDIA CONFERENCE: Documentary Filmmaker Rob Stewart’s Death was a ‘Preventable Tragedy,’ Family Filing Lawsuit Tuesday

 

Family Set To Speak During Media Conference Tuesday Morning

 

Coral Gables, Florida – The family of Canadian conservationist and documentary film producer Rob Stewart, whose body was found off the coast of Islamorada on February 3, is filing a lawsuit against several businesses and people involved in his fatal dive. The Stewart family hopes the legal action will push out and/or change the ways of all irresponsibly operating diving businesses and help keep attention on Stewart’s mission of ocean conservation. The family is set to speak at a media conference, to be held Tuesday, March 28 at 10:45 AM at The Haggard Law Firm, 330 Alhambra Circle, Coral Gables, FL 33134.

 

Among the defendants in the case is the company Add Helium, which is owned by Peter Sotis, who is also named in the lawsuit. The Ft. Lauderdale-based company was in charge of the dive and sold the equipment utilized by the divers. Sotis has a checkered past. He is a convicted felon, is under investigation for utilizing unapproved Chinese air tanks as detailed in a Miami Herald article (click to read Herald article), and has been accused of selling military-grade scuba equipment to a Libyan militant.

Andy Haggard: Mercer Law Day Keynote Speaker

  Last Friday Haggard Law Firm Senior Partner William Andrew Haggard was the Keynote Speaker at the Mercer Law School's Law Day Celebration. Haggard was also one of the judges for the School's Hugh Lawson Moot Court Competition which features first-year students and helps expose competitors to moot court practice and procedure before trying out for Mercer's Nationally recognized Moot Court team. 'Andy' Haggard received his J.D. from Mercer Law in 1967. He is a current member of the Mercer University Board of Trustees. To learn more about Mr. Haggard click here to read his bio The Mercer University Walter F. George School of...

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VIDEO: Negligent Security & Mass Shootings

  Has the increased number of mass shootings and victims of these tragedies changed what should be considered adequate security for businesses and properties where large groups of people commonly gather? Our Michael Haggard discusses the topic in our latest HLF TV installment.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QejG_GCSQd4...

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Haggard Law Firm CLE Event

On Thursday, April 27TH, The Haggard Law Firm will host Winning Case Strategies in Premises LiabilityThe free seminar, for CLE Credit, will be held at the Hyatt in Coral Gables, Florida.

Please RSVP by contacting Susie Acosta at 305.446.5700 or emailing sacosta@haggardlawfirm.com by April 20th. There is limited space available.

Background Checks: Everywhere and Nowhere

 

By: Christopher Marlowe, The Haggard Law Firm

The background check. Examinations of our past seem so common in every corner of our lives, that on that rare occasion where we are not asked to verify our personal information or consent to an examination of it, the transaction seems either charmingly quaint or mildly suspicious.  Our criminal history, finances, family relations, utilities, medical history, schooling or employment, to name a few, are routinely brought forth and scrutinized (or verified) as a necessary part of routine personal and business operations.

 

The ubiquity of the background check has fomented a public expectation that virtually every person we encounter has been screened for one thing or another.  Certainly, the priest or teacher is screened for child or sexual related offenses. The Uber driver has been thoroughly vetted for traffic offenses.  The apartment manager’s personal finances are in order, such that the proper handling of rents is not in jeopardy.

These expectations, however reasonable, are not subject to uniform regulation and even more rarely are they mandated by law.  The inconsistent handling of sex offender regulations helps highlight our misperception of the efficacy and regularity of background checks.  Society considers itself tough on sex offenders, and lawmakers fashion themselves as protectors of the children and those most vulnerable.  Florida Statute 948.30 is a good example.  If a sex crime victim was under the age of 18, the offender cannot work for pay “or as a volunteer at any place where children regularly congregate, including, but not limited to, schools, child care facilities, parks, playgrounds, pet stores, libraries, zoos, theme parks, and malls.”